Pissed Off People

Jim is basically your average bloke. One Saturday afternoon, about 25 years ago, he’s doing something a lot of average blokes do; cleaning his home – a small farmhouse in the west of England.

After some dusting, it’s time to vacuum. Like everyone at the time, he’s shocked how quickly his top-of-the-line Hoover cleaner loses its suction power.

Jim is pissed. Royally pissed off. Madder than a wet hen.

So mad, in fact, that he took the cleaner out to his shed, took it apart and examined why it would lose suction power so quickly. After a few experiments he correctly deduced that the issue was that fine dust blocked the filter almost immediately and that’s why performance in conventional cleaners dips so fast.

Jim continued to be pissed until one day he visited a timber mill, looking for some wood. In those days, timber mills planed the logs on the spot for you. Jim watched as he saw his wood travel along until it reached a cyclone specifically designed to change the dynamics of airflow, separating the dust from the air via centrifugal force.

BOOM! James Dyson, still pissed at how shit traditional vacuum cleaners were, got the core idea of the Dyson cyclone cleaner. An idea that he would use to eventually deposit over £3 billion into his back pocket.

Unbelievably it took Dyson three years and 5,127 small, incremental prototypes to finally “perfect” his design and revolutionize cleaning forever. Can you imagine how pissed you’d need to be to work, diligently, over that many iterations to finally see your idea through?

Dyson’s story is incredible and enlightening – offering us a couple of key insights into the innovative process.

First, most folks think that innovation happens as a result of ideas just popping into people’s heads. That’s missing the key piece of the puzzle: the problem! Without a problem, a flaw, a frustration, innovation cannot happen. As Dyson himself states, “creativity should be thought of as a dialogue. You have to have a problem before you can have game-changing innovation”.

Second, for innovative solutions to emerge you need pissed off people. People like Dyson who are mad, frustrated and generally peeved with current solutions and approaches for the problem at hand. So they are always thinking, connecting and, at times, creating a breakthrough solution – sometimes years after initially surfacing the problem. So, while it’s easy to say that the “idea” just happened, more often than not you’ve been mulling it over, subconsciously, because you’re pissed about something.

Here’s a true story about and how it eventually saw the light of day as a result of some pissed off people.

About 25 years ago, I was the leader of a team whose mandate was to improve supply chain planning for a large, very successful Canadian retailer. I won’t bore you with the details but eventually we designed, on paper, what we now call Flowcasting.

Problem was that it was very poorly received by the company’s Senior Leadership team, especially the Supply Chain executives. On numerous occasions I was informed that this idea would never work and that we needed to change the design. I was also threatened to be fired more than once if we didn’t change.

The problem was, our team loved the design and could see it potentially working. As I was getting more pressure and “never” from the leadership team, I was getting more and more pissed. Royally pissed off as a matter of fact.

As luck would have it, as a pissed off person, I didn’t back down (there’s a lesson here too – “never” is not a valid reason why something might not work, regardless who says it). One person on the team suggested I contact Andre Martin and he and his colleague, Darryl Landvater, helped us convince the non-believers that it would be the future and that we should pilot a portion of the design. The rest is, of course, history.

The Flowcasting saga didn’t stop there. As we were embarking on our early pilot of the DC-supplier integration, Andre and Darryl tried, unsuccessfully, to convince a few major technology planning vendors that an integrated solution, from store/consumption to supply was needed and that they needed to build it, from scratch.

All the major technology players turned them down, citing lots of “nevers” themselves as to why this solution was either not needed, or would not scale and/or work.

To be honest, it pissed them off, as they’ve admitted to me many times over the years.

So much so, that, despite all the warnings from the experts they “put their money where their mouth is” and built a Flowcasting solution that connects the store to supplier in an elegant, intuitive and seamless fashion – properly planning for crucial retail planning scenarios like slow sellers, promotions, and seasonal items just to name a few.

In 2015, using the concept of Flowcasting and the technology that they developed, a retailer seamlessly connected their supply chain from consumption to supply – improving in-stocks, sales and profits and instilling a process that facilitates any-channel planning however they wish to do it.

Sure, having a reasonably well thought out design was important. As was having a solution suited for the job.

But what really enabled the breakthrough were some pissed-off people!

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